LGBTQ Weddings Vs The Wedding Industry.

LGBTQ Weddings Vs The Wedding Industry.

Alannah & Tracy photo by Kattch Weddings

 

It's a great time to be in love if you're a lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender individual. Until fairly recently, same-sex marriage across the United States was illegal (and even unconstitutional according to some), but now it's enjoyed almost nationwide. Public opinion on this issue has also changed dramatically: A 2015 Pew Research Center survey found that 57% of Americans were in favor of same-sex marriage; by 2017, that number had increased to 62%. That being said, the wedding industry still has some progress to make when it comes to catering to LGBTQ couples.

LGBTQ weddings are on the rise

It's no surprise that the LGBTQ wedding industry is booming. With more and more people choosing to get married, it's a growing industry full of happy couples and vendors who cater to their needs. But there are also some downsides to this trend—namely, an increase in prices for services like wedding cakes and photography.

As you might expect, LGBTQ weddings are on the rise. In fact, they're so popular that they've even been called "the new normal." And while they're still not widely accepted in all parts of society (and never will be), they do seem to be becoming increasingly normalized here in America. If nothing else, you can take comfort knowing that there are plenty of vendors out there ready and willing to help make yours as beautiful as possible!

LGBTQ weddings are massive business

The wedding industry is a massive industry, with $200 billion in annual revenue. More specifically, the LGBTQ wedding industry is now a $1.5 billion dollar business and growing at an average rate of 30% per year. It's clear that there's money to be made here!

The question you may be asking yourself—and the one I'll address in this article—is whether or not you should get into this business.

The wedding industry is still heteronormative

You may be wondering, “How does this affect me?” Well, it affects you because the wedding industry is still largely catering to straight couples. If you want to get married and have a good time, you might have to spend more money and time than your straight friends who don't need as many providers or products supporting their nuptials.

Of course, there are some things in favor of LGBTQ weddings: people who identify as such are less likely to be religious and more likely to do something new and different with their special day. But aside from that, there's no real difference between gay weddings and straight ones when it comes down to it—at least not yet!

The wedding industry still has some progress to make when it comes to catering to LGBTQ couples.

Despite the growing number of LGBTQ couples, the wedding industry has taken some time to catch up. Wedding vendors still face prejudice from their clients and from other vendors in the industry. If you're interested in getting married but have concerns about how your sexuality will affect your options, here are some things to consider:

The wedding industry is heteronormative by default—it was designed for straight couples after all! This means that LGBTQ couples may be limited in their options when it comes to venues or vendors who don’t cater specifically to them. For example, while there are many venues that only host same-sex weddings, they aren't always easy to find on sites like The Knot or Wedding Wire (which focus primarily on heterosexual weddings), so make sure you do your research beforehand if this applies specifically where you live/are getting married!

LGBTQ couples tend toward lavish weddings more than heterosexual ones do; however, this trend could change as younger generations grow more accustomed with having more affordable lifestyles without sacrificing quality experiences like traveling together or getting married at certain times during year long holidays like Christmas Eve/New Years Eve which may save money compared with doing so during other times throughout year even though costs might be higher depending upon destination chosen."



The wedding industry does not have a great reputation for inclusion; this is an area it could definitely improve. As more LGBTQ couples get married, the industry needs to adapt. LGBTQ couples deserve to be treated as equals when they are shopping for their dream wedding.

It's a great time to be in love if you're a lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender individual. Until fairly recently, same-sex marriage across the United States was illegal (and even unconstitutional according to some), but now it's enjoyed almost nationwide. Public opinion on this issue has also changed dramatically: A 2015 Pew Research Center survey found that 57% of Americans were in favor of same-sex marriage; by 2017, that number had increased to 62%. That being said, the wedding industry still has some progress to make when it comes to catering to LGBTQ couples.

LGBTQ weddings are on the rise

It's no surprise that the LGBTQ wedding industry is booming. With more and more people choosing to get married, it's a growing industry full of happy couples and vendors who cater to their needs. But there are also some downsides to this trend—namely, an increase in prices for services like wedding cakes and photography.

As you might expect, LGBTQ weddings are on the rise. In fact, they're so popular that they've even been called "the new normal." And while they're still not widely accepted in all parts of society (and never will be), they do seem to be becoming increasingly normalized here in America. If nothing else, you can take comfort knowing that there are plenty of vendors out there ready and willing to help make yours as beautiful as possible!

LGBTQ weddings are massive business

The wedding industry is a massive industry, with $200 billion in annual revenue. More specifically, the LGBTQ wedding industry is now a $1.5 billion dollar business and growing at an average rate of 30% per year. It's clear that there's money to be made here!

The question you may be asking yourself—and the one I'll address in this article—is whether or not you should get into this business.

The wedding industry is still heteronormative

You may be wondering, “How does this affect me?” Well, it affects you because the wedding industry is still largely catering to straight couples. If you want to get married and have a good time, you might have to spend more money and time than your straight friends who don't need as many providers or products supporting their nuptials.

Of course, there are some things in favor of LGBTQ weddings: people who identify as such are less likely to be religious and more likely to do something new and different with their special day. But aside from that, there's no real difference between gay weddings and straight ones when it comes down to it—at least not yet!

The wedding industry still has some progress to make when it comes to catering to LGBTQ couples.

Despite the growing number of LGBTQ couples, the wedding industry has taken some time to catch up. Wedding vendors still face prejudice from their clients and from other vendors in the industry. If you're interested in getting married but have concerns about how your sexuality will affect your options, here are some things to consider:

The wedding industry is heteronormative by default—it was designed for straight couples after all! This means that LGBTQ couples may be limited in their options when it comes to venues or vendors who don’t cater specifically to them.

For example, while there are many venues that only host same-sex weddings, they aren't always easy to find on sites like The Knot or Wedding Wire (which focus primarily on heterosexual weddings), so make sure you do your research beforehand if this applies specifically where you live/are getting married!

LGBTQ couples tend toward lavish weddings more than heterosexual ones do; however, this trend could change as younger generations grow more accustomed with having more affordable lifestyles without sacrificing quality experiences like traveling together or getting married at certain times during year long holidays like Christmas Eve/New Years Eve which may save money compared with doing so during other times throughout year even though costs might be higher depending upon destination chosen."



The wedding industry does not have a great reputation for inclusion; this is an area it could definitely improve. As more LGBTQ couples get married, the industry needs to adapt. LGBTQ couples deserve to be treated as equals when they are shopping for their dream wedding.